Maine

In January 2017, Representatives Deane Rykerson, Seth Berry, Lydia Blume, Janice Cooper, and Stanley Zeigler and Senators Shenna Bellows, Geoffrey Gratwick, and David Miramant introduced the National Popular Vote bill (Status of LD156). 

On January 7, 2009, Representative John L. Martin introduced the National Popular Vote bill (LD 56).  While a member of Maine's House of Representatives in 1969, John Martin sponsored Maine’s current law governing the awarding of electoral votes. Under this 1969 legislation, two of Maine's electoral votes are awarded by congressional district, and two are awarded on a statewide basis. In 1992, Nebraska adopted legislation patterned after Maine's 1969 law. 

On April 14, 2008, the Maine Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill (LD 744).

On March 30, 2007, Senator John L. Martin sponsored the National Popular Vote bill ( LD 1744 ).  

A survey of 800 Maine voters conducted on January 9-10, 2009 showed 77% overall support for a national popular vote for President. By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote was 85% among Democrats, 70% among Republicans, and 73% among others. By gender, support for a national popular vote was 82% among women and 71% among men. By age, support for a national popular vote was 79% among 18-29 year olds, 67% among 30-45 year olds, 78% among 46-65 year olds, and 82% for those older than 65. By congressional district, support for a national popular vote was 78% in the First congressional district and 76% in the Second district. By race, support for a national popular vote was 79% among whites (representing 94% of respondents) and 56% among others (representing 6% of respondents).

In a follow-up question presenting a three-way choice among various methods of awarding Maine's electoral votes,

  • 71% favored a national popular vote;
  • 21% favored Maine's current system of awarding its electoral votes by congressional district; and
  • 8% favored the statewide winner-take-all system (i.e., awarding all of Maine's electoral votes to the candidate who receives the most votes statewide).

The survey had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 1/2%.

On February 2, 2010, the Maine House defeated the National Popular Vote bill.