Arizona

In January 2017, the National Popular Vote bill was re-introduced (Status of HB2277).

On February 4, 2016, the Arizona House of Representatives passed the National Popular Vote bill, with two-thirds of the members voting in favor of the legislation. The vote was 40 Yes, 16 No, and 4 absences or abstentions. The Arizona House is the third Republican-controlled state legislative chamber to pass the bill (the Oklahoma Senate and New York Senate being the other two).

Representative J. D. Mesnard (R) speaking on HB 2456

On February 4, 2016, the House Committee of the Whole approved the National Popular Vote bill.

On February 2, 2016, the House Elections Committee gave the National Popular Vote bill a “do pass” recommendation with a 5-1 vote, and the House Rules Committee approved the bill 7-0. Arizona Capitol Times article.

In January 2016, two-thirds of the Republicans and two-thirds of the Democrats in the Arizona House of Representatives sponsored the National Popular Vote bill (Status of HB 2456). The bill was sponsored by Representative J. D. Mesnard and 39 other Representatives.

Representative J. D. Mesnard

In January 2016, two-thirds of the Arizona Senate sponsored the National Popular Vote bill (Status of SB 1218). The bill was sponsored by Senator Don Shooter and 19 other Senators.

Senator Don Shooter

In July 2–3, 2015, a survey of 833 Arizona voters was conducted showing 78% overall support for the idea that the President of the United States should be the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states. Voters were asked:

"How do you think we should elect the President: Should it be the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states, or the current electoral college system?"

By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote for President was 76% among Republicans, 82% among Democrats, and 75% among independents/others.  By gender, support was 85% among women and 70% among men.  By age, support was 95% among 18-29 year olds, 73% among 30-45 year olds, 78% among 46-65 year olds, and 77% for those older than 65.  By race, support was 79% among whites, 73% among Hispanics, 67% among African-Americans (representing 3% of all respondents), and 78% among others (representing 5% of all respondents).  In a second question, Arizona voters were asked:

"Do you think you will probably vote for the Democratic nominee for President in 2016, the Republican nominee, or some other party's nominee?"

In this July 2015 poll, 46% said the Republican nominee, 38% said the Democratic nominee, and 17% said some other party's nominee.

In a third question, Arizona voters were asked:

"Do you prefer a system where the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states on a nationwide basis is elected President, or one like the one used in Nebraska and Maine where electoral voters are dispensed by Congressional district, or one in which all of the state's electoral votes would be given to the statewide winner?

In this third question, 73% preferred the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states; 14% preferred that electoral votes be dispensed by congressional district; and 13% preferred that all of the state's electoral votes go to the statewide winner (the existing "winner-take-all" rule).

The survey was conducted by Public Policy Polling, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 1/2%. Details of Arizona poll

In February 2011, Representatives Cecil Ash (R) and Judy M. Burges (R) introduced the National Popular Vote bill (HB 2663) in the House, and Senator Scott Bundgaard (R) introduced the same bill in the Senate.

On February 4, 2008, Senators Paula Aboud, Albert Hale, Richard Miranda, Charlene Pesquiera, Landrum Taylor, Rebecca Rios, Soltero and Representative Jack A. Brown introduced the National Popular Vote bill in the Arizona Legislature (SB 1370 Status of SB 1370).

In 2007, Arizona State Representatives Bill Konopnicki, Jack A. Brown, and Lucy Mason have introduced the National Popular Vote bill (HB2297) into the Arizona House of Representatives for the 2007 session. Senator Paula Aboud has introduced the bill into the Senate. Arizona Daily Star article