Georgia

In January 2017, Senators Steve Henson, Horacena Tate, Gloria Butler, Valencia Seay, Harold Jones, and Elena Parent introduced the National Popular Vote bill (Status of SB64).

On February 11, 2016, Georgia Senate President Pro Tempore David Shafer (R) and Minority Leader Steve Henson (D), and others introduced the National Popular Vote bill in the Georgia Senate (SB 376).

In February 2016, Georgia state Representatives Earl Ehrhart (R), Minority Leader Stacey Abrams (D), and others introduced the National Popular Vote bill in the Georgia House of Representatives (HB 929).

Rep. Earl Ehrhart (R)
Rep. Stacey Abrams (D)

A survey of 819 Georgia voters conducted on January 27-28, 2015 showed 74% overall support for the idea that the President of the United States should be the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states. Voters were asked 

"How do you think we should elect the President: Should it be the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states, or the current electoral college system?"

By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote for President was 75% among Republicans, 78% among Democrats, and 67% among others. By gender, support was 80% among women and 68% among men. By age, support was 68% among 18-29 year olds, 77% among 30-45 year olds, 74% among 46-65 year olds, and 76% for those older than 65. By race, support was 77% among whites, 71% among African-Americans, and 67% among others (representing 7% of all respondents). 

In a second question, Georgia voters were asked

"Do you think you will probably vote for the Democratic nominee for President in 2016, the Republican nominee, or some other party's nominee?" 

In this January 2015 poll, 42% said the Democratic nominee, 48% said the Republican nominee, and 10% said some other party's nominee.

  • 87% of Democrats said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 5% for the Republican nominee, and 8% for another party's nominee. 
  • 2% of Republicans said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 94% for the Republican nominee, and 4% for another party's nominee. 
  • 32% of independent/others said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 43% for the Democratic nominee, and 25% for another party's nominee. 

By gender, 49% of women said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 44% for the Republican nominee, and 7% for another party's nominee. 34% of men said they would probably vote for Democratic nominee, 54% for the Republican nominee, and 13% for another party's nominee. 

By race, 24% of whites said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 66% for the Republican nominee, and 10% for another party's nominee. 84% of African-Americans said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 9% for the Republican nominee, and 7% for another party's nominee. Among others (representing 7% of all respondents), 37% of said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 38% for the Republican nominee, and 25% for another party's nominee. 

The survey was conducted by Public Policy Polling, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 1/2%. Report with cross-tabs

On February 1, 2009, Representatives Stephanie Benfield, Karla Drenner, Tyrone Brooks, Randal Mangham, and Alisha Morgan introduced the National Popular Vote bill into the House (HB 408). Senators Nan Orrock, Gail Buckner, Vincent Fort, Gloria Butler, and Valencia Seay introduced the bill into the Senate (SB 134).

On March 1, 2007, Representatives Bob Holmes, Stephanie Benfield, Margaret Kaiser, Hugh Floyd, Alisha Morgan, and Howard Mosby have introduced the National Popular Vote bill in Georgia (HB 630) (Status of HB 630). Atlanta Journal article Tom Crawford column in Covington News