Missouri

In january 2017, Representative Jon Carpenter introduced the National Popular Vote bill (Status of HB635) and Representative Randy Dunn also introduced the bill (Status of HB497). 

In Feburary 2016, Senators Dave Schatz (R) and Rob Schaaf (R) introduced the National Popular Vote bill into the Missouri Senate (Status of SB 1041).

In January 2016, Representative Tony Dugger (R) introduced the National Popular Vote bill into the Missouri House of Representatives (Status of HB 1959). Representative Jeremy LaFaver (D) introduced an identical bill (Status of HB 2048). Both Representatives Dugger and LaFaver are co-sponsors of the other bill. 

A survey of 840 Missouri voters conducted on January 26-27, 2015 showed 75% overall support for the idea that the President of the United States should be the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states. Voters were asked, "How do you think we should elect the President: Should it be the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states, or the current electoral college system?"  By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote for President was 78% among Republicans, 73% among Democrats, and 73% among independents/others. By gender, support was 79% among women and 70% among men. By age, support was 82% among 18-29 year olds, 66% among 30-45 year olds, 76% among 46-65 year olds, and 73% for those older than 65. By race, support was 76% among whites. 69% among African-Americans, and 59% among others (representing 6% of all respondents). 

In a second question, Missouri voters were asked, "Do you think you will probably vote for the Democratic nominee for President in 2016, the Republican nominee, or some other party's nominee?" In this January 2015 poll, 37% said the Democratic nominee, 48% said the Republican nominee, and 15% said some other party's nominee.  In the cross-tabs on this question about the 2016 presidential election in Missouri (asked January 26-27, 2015),

  • 85% of Democrats said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 9% for the Republican nominee, and 6% for another party's nominee.
  • 1% of Republicans said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 92% for the Republican nominee, and 7% for another party's nominee.
  • 27% of independent/others said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 37% for the Republican nominee, and 36% for another party's nominee.

By gender, 38% of women said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee for President in 2016, 47% for the Republican nominee, and 15% for another party's nominee. 36% of men said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 48% for the Republican nominee, and 16% for another party's nominee.  By race, 31% of whites said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee for President in 2016, 54% for the Republican nominee, and 15% for another party's nominee. 85% of African-Americans said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 9% for the Republican nominee, and 6% for another party's nominee. Among others (representing 6% of all respondents), 29% of said they would probably vote for the Democratic nominee, 30% for the Republican nominee, and 42% for another party's nominee.  The survey was conducted by Public Policy Polling, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 1/2%. Report with cross-tabs

In February 2012, the National Popular Vote bill (HB 1719) was introduced in the Missouri House of Representatives by a bipartisan group including House Speaker Steve Tilley (R), Minority Leader Mike Talboy (D), House Elections Chair Tony Dugger (R), as well as Representatives Pat Conway (D), Stephen Webber (D), Clem Smith (D), Dave Hinson (R), and Sue Entlicher (R). 

In April 2011, the National Popular Vote bill (HB 974) was introduced in the Missouri House of Representatives by a bipartisan group of five Republican and five Democrats, including House Speaker Steve Tilley (R), Minority Leader Mike Talboy (D), Assistant Minority Floor Leader Tishaura Jones (D), Minority Caucus Secretary Sarah Lampe (D) and House Elections Chair Tony Dugger (R) as well as Representatives Pat Conway (D), Dave Hinson (R), Lincoln Hough (R), Todd L. Richardson (R), and Stephen Webber (D).

In January 2009, the National Popular Vote bill was introduced into the Missouri House of Representatives by Representatives Jeff Roorda, Ron Casey, John P. Burnett, Joseph Fallert, Jr., J.C. Kuessner, Bert Atkins, and Ed Schieffer (HB 452). 

On January 23, 2007, Missouri Representatives Jeff Roorda, Sam Page, Belinda Harris, Edward Wildberger, Ron Casey, and Jason R. Holsman introduced the National Popular Vote bill (HB 289) (Status of HB 289) in the House of Representatives for the 2007 legislative session.

In 2006, the National Popular Vote bill (HB 2090) was sponsored by Representative Robert Thane Johnson (R) and Representative Jeff Roorda (D).

On April 25, 2006, the Missouri House Elections Committee held an informational hearing on National Popular Vote's bill and heard testimony from former Congressman John Anderson (R–Illinois and Independent presidential candidate), John Buchanan (the first Republican to represent Birmingham, Alabama in Congress), and National Popular Vote President Barry Fadem.

National Popular Vote has the support of 66% of Missouri voters in an August-September 2005 poll and the support of 70% of Missouri voters in an October 2005 poll.