"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Washington

    OLYMPIA, May 6, 2009 — A poll of 800 Washington state voters conducted on May 5-6, 2009 showed 77% overall support for the idea that the President of the United States should be the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states.      Everett Herald Op-Ed by John Burbank      A referendum petition against the enactment of the National Popular Vote bill in Washington state garnered a total of 300 signatures and was abandoned on July 25, 2009.      Olympian article

    On April 28, 2009 — Governor Chris Gregoire signed the National Popular Vote bill, making Washington state the fifth state to join the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, and New Jersey previously enacted the National Popular Vote bill.      Olympian article


    Governor Chris Gregoire signs the National Popular Vote bill in Olympia, Washington on April 28, 2009, with Senator Joe McDermott (left), Dr. John R. Koza (Chair, National Popular Vote), and Jeff Gombosky.

    On April 15, 2009, the Washington House of Representatives passed the National Popular Vote bill, thereby sending the bill to Governor Chris Gregoire.      Seattle Post Intelligencer article      Columbian editorial      The Daily News editorial


    Washington Representative Roger Goodman debating the National Popular Vote bill on April 15, 2009.

    On March 13, 2009, the Washington State Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill (and SB5599).


    Washington State Senate passes National Popular Vote bill

    The National Popular Vote bill in Washington state has 41 sponsors. Senate sponsorship includes Senator Joe McDermott, Eric Oemig, Jeanne Kohl-Welles, Craig Pridemore, Chris Marr, Lisa Brown, Rodney Tom, Adam Klein, Rosemary McAuliffe, Debbie Regala, Paull Shin, Fred Jarrett, and Mary Margaret Haugen.

    House sponsorship in 2009 includes Representatives Roger Goodman, Sam Hunt, Timm Ormsby, Brendan Williams, Ruth Kagi, Lynn Kessler, Mary Helen Roberts, Dave Upthegrove, Geoff Simpson, Jim Moeller, Sherry Appleton, Mark Ericks, Dawn Morrell, Dennis Flannigan, Jeff Morris, Tami Green, Bob Hasegawa, Mike Sells, Marko Liias, Fred Finn, Dean Takko, Brian Blake, Tina Orwall, Scott White, Hans Dunshee, Maralyn Chase, Steve Conway, and Sharon Nelson.

    The 2009 bills include HB1350, HB1598, SB5204, and SB5599.     Status of HB1350     Status of HB1598     Status of SB5204     Status of SB5599

    In a December 2008 poll, 77% of Washington voters favored a national popular vote for President.

    On February 18, 2008, the Washington state Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill.      Seattle Post Intelligencer article      Longview Daily News editorial

    In the 2007-2008 legislative session, the 10 legislative sponsors of the National Popular Vote bill in Washington State included Representatives Joe McDermott (now Senator), Shirley Hankins, Mark Miloscia, Mike Armstrong, Fred Jarrett, and Tom Campbell and Senators Eric Oemig, Darlene Fairley, Craig Pridemore, and Jeanne Kohl-Welles. The House bill was HB 1750 (Status of HB 1750), and the Senate bill was SB 5628 (Status of SB 5628).      Joel Connelly column




    Washington Senator Joe McDermott
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    Washington Rep. Shirley Hankins
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    Washington Rep. Mark Miloscia
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    Washington Rep. Mike Armstrong
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    Washington Rep. Fred Jarrett
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    Washington Rep. Tom Campbell
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    Washington Senator Eric Oemig
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    Washington Senator Darlene Fairley
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    Washington Senator Craig Pridemore
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    Washington Senator Jeanne Kohl-Welles
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    Washington Rep. Sherry Appleton
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    Washington Rep. Jeannie Darneille
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    Washington Rep. Al O'Brien
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    Washington Rep. Bob Hasegawa
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    Washington Rep. Mary Helen Roberts
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    Washington Rep. Timm Ormsby
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    Washington Rep. Maralyn Chase
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    Washington Rep. Brendan Williams
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    Washington Rep. Brian Blake
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    Washington Rep. Dave Upthegrove
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    Washington Rep. Dawn Morrell
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    Washington Rep. Dean Takko
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    Washington Rep. Dennis Flannigan
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    Washington Rep. Fred Finn
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    Washington Rep. Geoff Simpson
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    Washington Rep. Hans Dunshee
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    Washington Rep. Jeff Morris
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    Washington Rep. Jim Moeller
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    Washington Rep. Lynn Kessler
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    Washington Rep. Mark Ericks
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    Washington Rep. Marko Liias
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    Washington Rep. Mary Helen Roberts
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    Washington Rep. Mike Sells
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    Washington Rep. Roger Goodman
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    Washington Rep. Ruth Kagi
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    Washington Rep. Sam Hunt
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    Washington Rep. Scott White
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    Washington Rep. Sharon Nelson
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    Washington Rep. Steve Conway
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    Washington Rep. Tami Green
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    Washington Rep. Tina Orwall
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    Washington Senator Adam Klein
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    Washington Senator Chris Marr
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    Washington Senator Debbie Regala
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    Washington Senator Fred Jarrett
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    Washington Senator Lisa Brown
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    Washington Senator Mary Margaret Haugen
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    Washington Senator Paull Shin
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    Washington Senator Rodney Tom
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    Washington Senator Rosemary McAuliffe
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President