"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Rhode Island

    PROVIDENCE, July 12, 2013 — Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee signed the National Popular Vote bill making Rhode Island the 10th jurisdiction to enact the bill, and giving the National Popular Vote bill 50.4% of the electoral votes needed to bring it into effect. The action came after the Rhode Island House re-passed the bill by a 48–21 margin.

    Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee signs National Popular Vote bill in July 2013

    On June 13, 2013, the Rhode Island Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill (S346) by a 30–4 margin. Democrats supported the bill by a 27-3 margin and Republicans supported it by a 3-1 margin. Later in the day, the Rhode Island House of Representatives passed the National Popular Vote bill (H5575) by a 41–31 margin.

    Rep. Raymond E. Gallison, Jr. (sponsor) presents bill on June 13, 2013

    House Speaker Gordon Fox presides over debate June 13, 2013

    Rhode Island House of Representatives debate on June 13, 2013

    On June 11, 2013, the Rhode Island Senate Judiciary Committee voted 10-0 in favor of the National Popular Vote bill (S346), allowing the bill to move to the Senate floor.

    On June 11, 2013, the House Judiciary committee voted 10–2 in favor of the National Popular Vote bill (H5575), allowing the bill to move to the House floor.

    On March 12, 2013 the Rhode Island House Judiciary Committee held hearings on the National Popular Vote bill (H5575).

    On February 28, 2013, the Senate Judiciary Committee held hearings on the National Popular Vote bill (S346).

    On February 14, 2013, Representatives Raymond E. Gallison, Jr., Christopher R. Blazejewski, Arthur Handy, Larry Valencia, and Raymond A. Hull introduced the National Popular Vote bill (H5575) in the Rhode Island House of Representatives.

    On February 13, 2013, Senators Erin P. Lynch, Paul W. Fogarty, Joshua B. Miller, Maryellen Goodwin, and Louis P. DiPalma introduced the National Popular Vote bill (H5575) in the Rhode Island Senate.

    On March 6, 2012, the Rhode Island Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the National Popular Vote bill. A House committee previously heard testimony on the bill.


    Senator Erin Lynch sponsored the National Popular Vote bill in Rhode Island


    Ryan O'Donnell of National Popular Vote testifies in favor of National Popular Vote bill at hearing of Senate Judiciary Committee on March 6, 2012

    On February 2, 2012, the National Popular Vote bill (H7388) was introduced into the Rhode Island House of Representatives by Representatives Gallison, Blazejewski, Valencia, Serpa, and Chippendale. The House bill has a total of 45 sponsors (in a 75-member chamber), including Representatives Christopher R. Blazejewski, Edith H. Ajello, Raymond A. Hull, Maria E. Cimini, Michael A. Tarro, Anastasia P. Williams, Scott A. Slater, Leo Medina, Charlene M. Lima, Peter G. Palumbo, Arthur Handy, David A. Bennett, Eileen S. Naughton, Frank G. Ferri, Robert E. Flaherty, Jared R. Nunes, Patricia A. Serpa, Scott J. Guthrie, Lisa P. Tomasso, Doreen Marie Costa, Donald J. Lally, Jr., Teresa Ann Tanzi, Spencer E. Dickinson, Donna M. Walsh, Samuel A. Azzinaro, Larry Valencia, Michael W. Chippendale, Deborah A. Fellela, Jeremiah T. O'Grady, Cale P. Keable, Gregory J. Schadone, Agostinho F. Silva, James N. McLaughlin, William San Bento, Jr., J. Patrick O'Neill, Elaine A. Coderre, Raymond H. Johnston Jr., Mary Duffy Messier, Joy Hearn, Jan P. Malik, Richard P. Morrison, Raymond E. Gallison, Jr., John G. Edwards, Deborah Ruggiero, and Peter Martin.

    The bill (S2333) has been introduced in the Rhode Island Senate by Senators Lynch, DiPalma, Lanzi, Pichardo, and Metts. The Senate bill has a total of 19 sponsors (in a 38-member chamber), including Senators Juan M. Pichardo, Rhoda E. Perry, Paul V. Jabour, Harold M. Metts, Michael J. Pinga, Christopher Scott Ottiano, Louis P. DiPalma, Donna M. Nesselbush, Elizabeth A. Crowley, Frank A. DeVall, Jr., Roger A. Picard, John J. Tassoni, Jr., Frank Lombardo III, Beatrice A. Lanzi, Joshua B. Miller, William A. Walaska, Erin P. Lynch, V. Susan Sosnowski, and Dennis L. Algiere.

    On June 16, 2011, the Rhode Island Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill (S-0164) by a 30–4 margin. Republicans favored the bill by a 6–1 margin, Democrats favored the bill by a 23–3 margin, and 1 Independent voted for the bill.

    On March 3, 2011, Representatives Christopher R. Blazejewski, Roberto DaSilva, J. Patrick O'Neill, Patricia A. Serpa, Agostinho F. Silva, John G. Edwards IV, Raymond E. Gallison Jr., Scott J. Guthrie introduced the National Popular Vote bill (H5659).

    On February 3, 2011, Senators Louis P. DiPalma, Beatrice A. Lanzi, Frank Lombardo, Erin P. Lynch, Roger A. Picard, Elizabeth A. Crowley, Michael J. McCaffrey, Donna M. Nesselbush, Juan M. Pichardo, V. Susan Sosnowski, and John J. Tassoni Jr Guthrie introduced the National Popular Vote bill (S164).

    On May 19, 2009, the Rhode Island Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill (S 161) by a 26-9 vote. The bill now goes to the Rhode Island House.

    On February 3, 2009, Senators Daniel P. Connors, Daniel DaPonte, Joshua Miller, Rhoda E. Perry, and Maryellen Goodwin introduced the National Popular Vote bill in the Rhode Island Senate (S 161)

    On June 20, 2008 — The Rhode Island House passed the National Popular Vote bill (S2112) (Status of S2112). Governor Carcieri vetoed the bill.

    On May 27, 2008, the Rhode Island Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill (S2112) (Status of S2112).

    On May 13, 2008, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved the National Popular Vote.

    On March 20, 2008, Senator Daniel Connors, joined by Senators Daniel DaPonte, Hanna Gallo, Maryellen Goodwin and James Doyle, introduced the National Popular Vote bill (S2112) (Status of S2112). In the House of Representatives, Judiciary Committee Chairman Donald J. Lally Jr., joined by Rep. David A. Segal, have introduced the measure (H7707) (Status of H7707). Senate hearings were heldng the week of the March 24th.

    On February 11, 2007, Rhode Island Senator Daniel Issa has introduced the National Popular Vote bill (S201) (Status of S201) in the Rhode Island Senate. In addition, Representatives Donald J. Lally Jr., David A. Segal, Arthur Handy, Edwin R. Pacheco, and Edith H. Ajello have introduced the National Popular Vote bill (H5976) (Status of H5976) in the House.

    Senator Daniel Issa was quoted in the Pawtucket Times saying:

    "The current method of electing our president empowers some citizens in some states at the expense of others."

    "The National Popular Vote plan would be much more democratic, and equitable, than the current practice."

    "The goal is making every vote matter the same, from one end of our nation to the other." "This is not a partisan issue, it is an equality issue. A vote in Rhode Island should be as important as a vote in any other state. And the person elected to lead our nation should be elected by all those votes, not some little-understood Electoral College machinations."

    "The move to a national popular vote is nothing new, but the last few presidential elections have truly raised the concerns of many people across the country about the validity and integrity of the current election process."




    Rhode Island Rep. Raymond E. Gallison, Jr
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Erin P. Lynch
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Daniel P. Connors
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Daniel DaPonte
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Joshua Miller
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Rhoda E. Perry
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Maryellen Goodwin
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Arthur Handy
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Daniel J. Issa
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Donald J. Lally Jr.
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. David A. Segal
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Edwin R. Pacheco
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Edith H. Ajello
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator James E. Doyle, II
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Hanna M. Gallo
    Legislative Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Christopher R. Blazejewski
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Roberto DaSilva
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. J. Patrick O'Neill
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Patricia A. Serpa
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Agostinho F. Silva
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. John G. Edwards, IV
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Scott J. Guthrie
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Louis P. DiPalma
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Beatrice A. Lanzi
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Frank Lombardo
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Roger A. Picard
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Elizabeth A. Crowley
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Michael J. McCaffrey
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Donna M. Nesselbush
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator Juan M. Pichardo
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator V. Susan Sosnowski
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Senator John J. Tassoni, Jr
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Larry Valencia
    Political Web Site


    Rhode Island Rep. Raymond A. Hull
    Political Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President