"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
Progress by State

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Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
    How should we elect the President?
    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

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    Explanation of National Popular Vote Bill


    Click here for Frequently Asked Questions

    1-Sentence Description
    The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia).

    3-Sentence Description
    Under the U.S. Constitution, the states have exclusive and plenary (complete) power to allocate their electoral votes, and may change their state laws concerning the awarding of their electoral votes at any time. Under the National Popular Vote bill, all of the state's electoral votes would be awarded to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the electoral votes—that is, enough electoral votes to elect a President (270 of 538).

    1-Page Description

    The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

    The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted by 10 jurisdictions possessing 136 electoral votes—50.4% of the 270 electoral votes necessary to activate it, including four small jurisdictions (Rhode Island, Vermont, Hawaii, and DC), three medium-size states (Maryland, Washington, and Massachusetts), and three big states (New Jersey, Illinois, and California).

    The bill has passed 33 legislative chambers in 22 states—most recently the Oklahoma Senate by a 28–18 vote. The bill has also passed chamber(s) in Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, and Oregon.

    The bill has been endorsed by 2,124 state legislators.

    The shortcomings of the current system of electing the President stem from state winner-take-all statutes (i.e., state laws that currently exist in 48 states that award all of a state’s electoral votes to the candidate receiving the most popular votes in each separate state).

    Because of these state winner-take-all statutes, candidates have no reason to pay attention to the issues of concern to voters in states where the statewide outcome is a foregone conclusion. Thus, four out of five states were ignored in the 2012 presidential election (see map below). Four states received two-thirds of the 253 events (Ohio, Florida, Virginia, and Iowa).

    The winner-take-all rule has permitted candidates to win the Presidency without winning the most popular votes nationwide in four of our 57 presidential elections—1 in 14 times. A shift of 59,393 votes in Ohio in 2004 would have elected John Kerry despite President Bush’s nationwide lead of over 3,000,000 votes. A shift of 214,393 votes in 2012 would have elected Mitt Romney despite President Obama’s nationwide lead of almost 5,000,000 votes.

    Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution gives the states exclusive control over awarding their electoral votes: “Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors….” The winner-take-all rule was used by only three states in 1789.

    Under the National Popular Vote interstate compact, all the electoral votes from the enacting states would be awarded to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and DC). The bill would take effect only when enacted by states possessing a majority of the electoral votes—that is, enough electoral votes to elect a President (270 of 538).

    The bill ensures that every vote, in every state, will matter in every presidential election.

    The National Popular Vote bill preserves the Electoral College and state control of elections.

    Our National Advisory Board includes former Senators Jake Garn (R–UT), Birch Bayh (D–IN), and David Durenberger (R–MN); former Cong. John Anderson (R–IL, I), John Buchanan (R–AL), Tom Campbell (R–CA), and Tom Downey (D–NY). Other supporters include former Senator Fred Thompson (R–TN), Governor Jim Edgar (R–IL), Cong. Tom Tancredo (R-CO), Governor Howard Dean (D–VT), and U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R–GA).

    Additional information is available in our book Every Vote Equal: A State-Based Plan for Electing the President by National Popular Vote and at www.NationalPopularVote.com.

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    620-Page Book
    You can read or download, for free, our book Every Vote Equal: A State-Based Plan for Electing the President by National Popular Vote, at www.every-vote-equal.com.


    "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote"
    The National Popular Vote bill consists of this 888-word interstate compact.

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    A detailed explanation of this legislation appears in chapter 6 of Every Vote Equal: A State-Based Plan for Electing the President by National Popular Vote.


    8 Editorials
    Editorials from New York Times (two editorials), Chicago Sun-Times, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Hartford Courant, Sacramento Bee, and Fayetteville Observer.

    PDF



    Discussion of Constitutionality
    A discussion of the constitutionality of the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote"; the historical appropriateness of the National Popular Vote bill; and the advantages of interstate compacts over constitutional amendments.


    Discussion of Question of Congressional Consent
    A discussion as to whether congressional consent is required for the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote."


    Discussion of Recounts under a National Popular Vote
    A discussion of how recounts would be less likely under a national popular vote for President than under the current system.


    Discussion of Withdrawal
    A discussion of the hypothetical scenario in which a state might try to change the "rules of the game" between the November general election for President and the mid-December meeting of the Electoral College by withdrawing from the interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote".


    1-Page "What People Are Saying" Flyer
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    Prepared Remarks at Initial Press Conference on February 23, 2006, in Washington


    FairVote's Report on Presidential Elections Inequality
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    Lawsuit by Delaware and 11 Predominantly Small States in 1966 Against Use of Winner-Take-All Rule by Large Battleground States

    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President