"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
Ask your legislators to pass National Popular Vote

ZIP:
Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
Progress by State

Tom Golisano

Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

  • Videos

    Fox Interview

    CBS Video

    Popular Vote

    Class Election

    more videos

    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
    How should we elect the President?
    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

    Add this poll to your web site
    West Virginia

    CHARLESTON, February 15, 2011 — Delegates Joe Talbott, Mike Caputo, and Guthrie introduced the National Popular Vote bill (HB 2387). Delegates Joe Talbott, Mike Caputo, Nancy Peoples Guthrie, Larry W. Barker, Brent Boggs, John N. Ellem, Allen V. Evans, Evans Fleischauer, Linda Longstreth, Mike Manypenny, Dale Martin, Cliff Moore, Daniel J. Poling, William R. Romine, and Ruth Rowan also introduced the bill.

    On February 14, 2011, Deleate (D) from McDowell County and Delegate Ellem (R) from Wood County wrote op-ed in Charleston Daily Mail entitled "Make West Virginia matter in presidential elections Our electoral votes should go to whoever wins the popular vote nationwide."

    On Feburary 8, 2011, the National Popular Vote bill (SB 463) was introduced in the Senate by Senators Senators Robert H. Plymale, John Pat Fanning, Ron Stollings, Larry J. Edgell, Robert D. Beach, Richard Browning, Daniel Foster, Mike Green, Evan H. Jenkins, Jeffrey V. Kessler, Orphy Klempa, Will Laird, Brooks F. McCabe, Jr., Ronald F. Miller, Herbert S. Snyder, Mark E. Wills, and Jack Yost.

    A survey of 800 West Virginia voters conducted on September 29–30, 2009 showed 81% overall support for the idea that the President of the United States should be the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states.

    Voters were asked: "How do you think we should elect the President: Should it be the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states, or the current Electoral College system?" By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote on the first question was 87% among Democrats, 75% among Republicans, and 73% among others. By gender, support was 87% among women and 73% among men. By age, support was 83% among 18-29 year olds, 80% among 30-45 year olds, 83% among 46-65 year olds, and 79% for those older than 65. By congressional district, support was 81% in the 1st district, 77% in the 2nd district, and 85% in the 3rd district. The survey was conducted by Public Policy Polling of North Carolina, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 1/2%.

    On February 16, 2009, Delegates Joe Talbott, Mike Caputo and Nancy Peoples Guthrie the National Popular Vote bill (HB 2442).

    On February 12, 2007, Senators Bailey, Plymale, Minard, Fanning, Bowman, Stollings, Hunter, Edgell and Prezioso the National Popular Vote bill (SB 482) (Status of SB 482) in the West Virginia legislature.




    West Virginia Senator Billy Wayne Bailey
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator Robert H. Plymale
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator Joseph M. Minard
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator John Pat Fanning
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator Edwin Bowman
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator Ron Stollings
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator Jon Blair Hunter
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator Larry J. Edgell
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Senator Roman Prezioso
    Legislative Web Site


    West Virginia Rep. Mike Caputo
    Legislative Web Site


    West Viriginia Rep. Joe Talbott
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    West Viriginia Rep. Nancy Peoples Guthrie
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    West Virginia Del. Larry W. Barker


    West Virginia Del. Brent Boggs


    West Virginia Del. John N. Ellem


    West Virginia Del. Allen V. Evans


    West Virginia Del. Barbara Evans Fleischauer


    West Virginia Del. Linda Longstreth


    West Virginia Del. Mike Manypenny


    West Virginia Del. Dale Martin


    West Virginia Del. Cliff Moore


    West Virginia Del. Daniel J. Poling


    West Virginia Del. William R. Romine


    West Virginia Del. Ruth Rowan


    West Virginia Senator Robert D. Beach


    West Virginia Senator Richard Browning


    West Virginia Senator Daniel Foster


    West Virginia Senator Mike Green


    West Virginia Senator Evan H. Jenkins


    West Virginia Senator Jeffrey V. Kessler


    West Virginia Senator Orphy Klempa


    West Virginia Senator Will Laird


    West Virginia Senator Brooks F. McCabe, Jr


    West Virginia Senator Ronald F. Miller


    West Virginia Senator Herbert S. Snyder


    West Virginia Senator Mark E. Wills


    West Virginia Senator Jack Yost
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President