"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
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In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Pennsylvania

    HARRISBURG, March 12, 2012 — The Pennsylvania House Majority Policy Committee today held a public hearing on Rep. Tom Creighton's (R–Lancaster) legislation to change the way Pennsylvania casts its Electoral College votes for president by aligning them with the national popular vote.

    "Today, the election for president is not won by a majority of votes by United States citizens. Instead, citizens vote for electors representing a state, who cast a set number of electoral votes during presidential elections based on the majority vote in their state," said Creighton. "This is a flawed approach in my opinion because it does not count every vote equally; therefore, a person who becomes president does so only on electoral votes. Under my bill, every vote in the nation that is cast would be counted. Under House Bill 1270, Pennsylvania would join a national compact to award each state's electoral votes to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes nationwide. This would not require a change to the constitution since the U.S. Constitution provides states the ability to award electoral votes in any manner the state chooses. It is a state right. In our nation's history, four presidents were elected to office without receiving a majority of the popular vote," said Creighton. "Clearly, changes are needed in order to adhere to the U.S. Constitution language of every vote being equal."

    Video Link: [WMV] [MP4]

    Those testifying at the March 12, 2012, hearing included Dr. G. Terry Madonna from Franklin and Marshall College; former American Legislative Exchange Council national chairman and former California state Sen. Raymond Haynes; former Minnesota state legislator Thomas Emmer; Dr. Charles Greenawalt, associate professor of government and political affairs at Millersville University; and Trent England, vice president of policy at Freedom Foundation. House Bill 1270 is under consideration by the House State Government Committee. At the hearing, Rep. Creighton noted that in a poll conducted by state political pollster Dr. G. Terry Madonna, nearly 75 percent of all Pennsylvanians support the idea of a national popular vote to elect the president.

    On September 18, 2011 — the National Popular Vote bill currently has 41 sponsors in the Pennsylvania legislature, including 9 sponsors in the Senate (listed below) and 33 sponsors in the House (listed below).

    The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in the entire United States. Under the National Popular Vote bill, all the electoral votes from the enacting states would be awarded to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and DC). The bill would take effect only when enacted by states possessing a majority of the electoral votes — that is, enough electoral votes to elect a President (270 of 538). The bill ensures that every vote, in every state, will matter in every presidential election.

    On September 12, 2011, Pennsylvania State Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi proposed that Pennsylvania's electoral votes be allocated by congressional district, as opposed to the current winner-take-all system (wherein all of Pennsylvania's electoral votes are awarded to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes statewide in Pennsylvania). State legislatures have the power to allocate their electoral votes by virtue of Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 of the U.S. Constitution stating "Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors." Maine and Nebraska currently use the congressional district approach.

    On June 17, 2011, Senators Richard L. Alloway II, David G. Argall, Edwin B. Erickson, Wayne D. Fontana, Timothy J. Solobay, Michael L. Waugh, Patricia H. Vance, Bob Mensch, and Lisa M. Boscola introduced the National Popular Vote bill (SB 1116) in the Senate.

    On May 12, 2011, Representatives Tom Creighton (R–Lancaster) and Rep. Mark Cohen (D–Philadelphia) announced their sponsorship of the National Popular Vote bill (HB 1270) in the Pennsylvania House. The bill was co-sponsored by Representatives Brendan Boyle, Joseph F. Brennan, Tim Briggs, Vanessa Lowery Brown, Thomas R. Caltagirone, Peter J. Daley III, Tina M. Davis, Garth D. Everett, Florindo J. Fabrizio, Mike Fleck, Marc J. Gergely, Jaret Gibbons, Mauree Gingrich, Neal P. Goodman, Rob W. Kauffman, Nick Kotik, Kurt A. Masser, Phyllis Mundy, Thomas P. Murt, T. Mark Mustio, John Myers, Eddie Day Pashinski, Tony J. Payton, Jr., Joseph Preston Jr., Jeffrey P. Pyle, Steven J. Santarsiero, Mario M. Scavello, Edward G. Staback, P. Michael Sturla, John Taylor, W. Curtis Thomas, Ronald G. Waters, and Rosita C. Youngblood.

    On April 8, 2011, noted Political Science Professor Dr. Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall University (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) released the results of a poll showing that two out of three Pennsylvanians believe the President should be the candidate who "gets the most votes in all 50 states."


    Video of Friday, April 8, 2011, news conference featuring Dr. G. Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall University (Lancaster, Pennsylvania), discussing National Popular Vote questions on recent poll conducted by Terry Madonna Opinion Research

    On March 3, 2011, National Popular Vote spokesman Tom Golisano kicked off the 2011 effort to enact the National Popular Vote bill in Harrisburg.

    Left to right: State Rep. Mark Cohen (D) of Philadelphia, National Popular Vote spokesman Tom Golisano, and State Rep. Tom Creighton (R) of Lancaster County


    On March 10, 2009, the National Popular Vote bill (HB 841) was introduced into the Pennsylvania House by 24 members, led by Representative Mark B. Cohen, and including Representatives Brendan F. Boyle , Tim Briggs, Vanessa Lowery Brown, Marc J. Gergely, Jaret Gibbons, Nick Kotik, Barbara McIlvaine Smith, John E. Pallone, Tony J. Payton, Jr., Tom C. Creighton, John Taylor, Babette Josephs, Robert E. Belfanti, Jr, Thomas R. Caltagirone, Dan Frankel, Neal P. Goodman, David K. Levdansky, Michael P. McGeehan, Cherelle Parker, John Siptroth, P. Michael Sturla, Don Walko and, Rosita C. Youngblood.      Op-Ed in Philadelphia Inquirer

    A survey of 800 Pennsylvania voters conducted on December 16-17, 2008 showed 78% overall support for a national popular vote for President.      Poll results

    On October 18, 2007, the Intergovernmental Affairs Committee of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives held a hearing on the National Popular Vote bill (HB 1028). The bill in Pennsylvania is sponsored by 21 House members, including Representatives Mark B. Cohen (Majority Caucus Chair), W. Curtis Thomas (Chairman of the committee), and David J. Steil (Minority chairman of the committee).      John Baer column      Dick Polman column

    Outside testimony at the hearing (agenda) was provided by

    • Vermont State Representative Chris Pearson (testimony) (bio)
    • Professor Jack Nagel of University of Pennsylvania (testimony)
    • John Samples of the Cato Institute, Washington DC (working paper) (testimony) (bio)
    • Barry Kauffman, Executive Director of Common Cause of Pennsylvania (testimony)
    • Larry Sokol of National Popular Vote (testimony) (bio)

    Additional information about the hearing:

    Transcript of the hearing.

    On April 5, 2007, the National Popular Vote bill (HB 1028) was introduced in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives by 21 members, namely Representatives Mark B. Cohen, W. Curtis Thomas, Robert E. Belfanti, Vince Biancucci, Thomas R. Caltagirone, Dan Frankel, Neal Goodman, Thaddeus Kirkland, Daylin Leach, David Levdansky, Kathy Manderino, Michael P. McGeehan, John Myers, Cherelle L. Parker, McIlvaine Smith, Timothy J. Solobay, David J. Steil, P. Michael Sturla, Thomas A. Tangretti, Don Walko, and Rosita C. Youngblood.




    Pennsylvania Rep. Tom C. Creighton
    Legislative Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Mark B. Cohen
    Legislative Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Robert E. Belfanti
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Vince Biancucci
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Thomas R. Caltagirone
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Dan Frankel
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Neal Goodman
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Thaddeus Kirkland
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Daylin Leach
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    Pennsylvania Rep. David Levdansky
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Kathy Manderino
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Michael P. McGeehan
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    Pennsylvania Rep. John Myers
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Cherelle L. Parker
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    Pennsylvania Rep. McIlvaine Smith
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Timothy J. Solobay
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    Pennsylvania Rep. David J. Steil
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    Pennsylvania Rep. P. Michael Sturla
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Thomas A. Tangretti
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Don Walko
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Rosita C. Youngblood
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    Pennsylvania Rep. John J. Siptroth
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Babette Josephs
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Barbara McIlvaine Smith
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Brendan F. Boyle
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Jaret Gibbons
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. John E. Pallone
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Rep. John Taylor
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Marc J. Gergely
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Nick Kotik
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Tim Briggs
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. W. Curtis Thomas
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Tony J. Payton, Jr.
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Vanessa Lowery Brown
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Joseph F. Brennan
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Peter J. Daley, III
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Tina M. Davis
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Garth D. Everett
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Florindo J. Fabrizio
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Fleck
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Mauree Gingrich
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    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Rob W. Kauffman
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Kurt A. Masser
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Phyllis Mundy
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Thomas P. Murt
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Rep. T. Mark Mustio
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Joseph Preston, Jr.
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Jeffrey P. Pyle
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Steven J. Santarsiero
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Mario M. Scavello
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Rep. Edward G. Staback
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Rep. Ronald G. Waters
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Senator Richard L. Alloway II
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Senator David G. Argall
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Senator Edwin B. Erickson
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Senator Wayne D. Fontana
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Senator Timothy J. Solobay
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Pennsylvania Senator Michael L. Waugh
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Senator Patricia H. Vance
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Senator Bob Mensch
    Legislative Web Site
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    Pennsylvania Senator Lisa M. Boscola
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site

    In 1966, Delaware Attorney General David P. Buckson filed a lawsuit on behalf of the state of Delaware against New York (and other states) concerning the use of the winner-take-all rule in presidential elections. Under the winner-take-all rule (also called the "unit rule" or "general ticket" system), all of a state's electoral votes are awarded to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in each separate state. In 1966, Delaware led a group of 12 predominantly low-population states (including North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Utah, Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Iowa, Kentucky, Florida, Pennsylvania) in suing New York in the U.S. Supreme Court. In State of Delaware v. State of New York, the plaintiff states argued that New York's use of the winner-take-all rule effectively disenfranchised voters in their states. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case (presumably because of the well-established constitutional provision that the manner of awarding electoral votes is exclusively a state decision). Ironically, the defendant (New York) is no longer an influential closely divided battleground state (as it was in the 1960s). Today, New York suffers the very same disenfranchisement as most of the less populous states because it too has become politically non-competitive. Today, a vote in New York is equal to a vote in Delaware: votes in both are equally irrelevant in presidential elections.

    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President