"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
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    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

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    Montana

    HELENA, April 18, 2011 — The Montana Senate voted 30–20 for a bill to study (SJ 24) the National Popular Vote bill.

    On January 15, 2007, Montana Senators Rick Laible and Jesse Laslovich and Representatives Rep. Walter McNutt and Hal Jacobson have introduced National Popular Vote bill (SB 290) (Status of SB 290) in Montana.      Pearson letter to Legislature

    A survey of 842 Montana voters conducted on January 4–5, 2011 showed 72% overall support for the idea that the President of the United States should be the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states. Voters were asked "How do you think we should elect the President: Should it be the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states, or the current electoral college system?" By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote was 67% among Republicans, 80% among Democrats, and 70% among others. By gender, support was 80% among women and 63% among men. By age, support was 72% among 18-29 year olds, 67% among 30-45 year olds, 75% among 46-65 year olds, and 73% for those older than 65. The survey was conducted by Public Policy Polling, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 1/2%.

    According to an Associated Press story in the Great Falls Tribune:

    Republican Sen. Rick Laible and other supporters said the change would make Montana and other sparsely populated states more of a factor in presidential races and could increase voter turnout.

    " 'This affirms what we all hear, which is one man, one woman, one vote,' Laible told the Senate State Administration Committee. "The electoral voting system doesn't allow that."

    On February 5, the 11-member State Administration Committee of the Montana Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill by a 9-2 vote.   Testimony   Article   Editorial

    On February 8, the Montana Senate defeated SB 290.   Article




    Montana Senator Rick Laible
    Legislative Web Site


    Montana Rep. Walter McNutt
    Legislative Web Site


    Montana Rep. Hal Jacobson
    Legislative Web Site


    Montana Senator Jesse Laslovich
    Legislative Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President