"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Four Out of Five American Were Ignored in 2012 Presidential Election
    Jan 27, 2013

    The table below shows the states in which the presidential and vice-presidential candidates held their 253 post-convention general-election campaign events in 2012.

    State Total Obama Biden Romney Ryan
    Ohio7315132718
    Florida4098158
    Virginia3664179
    Iowa275679
    Colorado235369
    Wisconsin185616
    Nevada134234
    New Hampshire134432
    Pennsylvania532
    North Carolina321
    Michigan11
    Minnesota11
    Alabama
    Alaska
    Arizona
    Arkansas
    California
    Connecticut
    Delaware
    D.C.
    Georgia
    Hawaii
    Idaho
    Illinois
    Indiana
    Kansas
    Kentucky
    Louisiana
    Maine
    Maryland
    Massachusetts
    Mississippi
    Missouri
    Montana
    Nebraska
    New Jersey
    New Mexico
    New York
    North Dakota
    Oklahoma
    Oregon
    Rhode Island
    South Carolina
    South Dakota
    Tennessee
    Texas
    Utah
    Vermont
    Washington
    West Virginia
    Wyoming
    Total25353488369

    As can be seen from the table:

    • In 2012, President Obama conducted post-convention campaign events in just eight states after being nominated, and Governor Romney did so in only 10 states. In comparison, in 2008, Obama conducted post-convention events in 14 states, and McCain did so in 19 states.
    • Four out of five states (and four out of five Americans) were ignored by the candidates in the post-convention campaign period in 2012.
    • Ohio received 73 of the 253 post-convention campaign events (29%).
    • Over two-thirds (69%) of the post-convention campaign events were conducted in just four states (Ohio, Florida, Virginia, and Iowa).
    • Only one of the 13 smallest states (i.e., those with three or four electoral votes) received any post-convention campaign events (New Hampshire).
    • Only three of the 25 smallest states (i.e., those with seven or fewer electoral votes) received any post-convention campaign events (New Hampshire, Iowa, and Nevada).
    • Only 12 states received even one post-convention campaign event involving a presidential or vice-presidential candidate.
    • The battle was fully joined in only eight states. That is, only eight states received campaign events from all four major-party candidates (i.e., Obama, Romney, Biden, and Ryan).

    This table is based on CNN’s “On the Trail” campaign tracker and covers the period from September 7, 2012 (the day after the Democratic National Convention) to November 6 (Election Day).

    These counts are based on public campaign events (e.g., rallies, speeches, town hall meetings). They does not include private fund-raisers, private meetings, non-campaign events (e.g., the Al Smith Dinner in New York City, the Clinton Global Initiative dinner), televised national debates (e.g., flying into a state just to participate in the debate), or interviews in television studios (e.g., flying into New York to do an interview). A “visit” to a state may consist of one or more individual events held at different places and times within the state. A joint appearance of a presidential and vice-presidential candidate is counted as one event. Additional information is available at http://www.fairvote.org/presidential-tracker.

    The table is sorted according to column 2 (showing the total number of campaign events per state). Columns 3, 4, 5, and 6 show the number of events by President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Governor Mitt Romney, and Congressman Paul Ryan, respectively.




    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President